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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 93 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2010 11:15pm EST
as the standard for their aspirations of course, the disappointed the arab world and the united states to nothing to prevent to the partition of the arab lands or those countries empires nor did american come to the assistance of the arab world when the united states returned after the second world war it was a dominant power to subordinate the middle east with priorities but with the election of barack obama united states seem to be on the threshold of a new era of positive and engagement and i have come here he told his audience to seek a new beginning between the united states and moslems around the world based upon mutual interest and mutual respect. he spoke of years of mistrust and of the needs to say openly of the things that we say in our hearts. there must be a sustained effort to listen to each other and learn from each other and to seek common ground. this language of mutual respect and understanding represented a total reversal of policies to the white house. gone was the language of the war on terror obamacare had requested staffers gone was the ambiguity over torture that had underm
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2010 6:30am EST
that of the united states in 2027 at 4:00 in the afternoon on the 25th of december. but i wonder what you're telling us about china employs anything more than that. in other words, it's not clear that your civilization state with its tradition of tributary relations with its neighbors and yes, maybe some african countries today, have an aspiration to rule the world. could you tell us if there is, in fact, some prospect of that? that doesn't seem to be in the tradition you're describing. and therefore, why worry? >> well, i think you put your finger on a very important distinction between the chinese tradition and the western tradition. they do share, they both are civilizations which have a strong sense of university. unlike japan for example, which it never did have a. but the way that's expressed is very different. whereas the century the european tradition sought to project it at the time across the world, and i suppose the colonial tradition was the most dramatic illustration of this, the chinese tradition have to do that. and by and large, except on the territory as it were of the chinese conti
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2010 1:00am EST
in facilitating the work i have done during the last three decades. one was the discovery in the united states initially and later canada, australia, united kingdom, and thousands of nazi war criminal -- criminals had emigrated posed as innocent refugees and allowed to enter and build their lives for themselves. one was the fact ad is the stage at this point* not much was not about the very important role the collaborators had played in the implementation of the final solution. the other was the soviet union and the fall of communism that opened brand new possibilities. i actually want to start with something else that is the basis for our efforts to bring out these two just is. i would summarize for the following points. it is interesting these questions are also asked 35 years ago. not now we're for relating the principles because the suspects are in their eighties. even with suspects in the '50s and '60s, 35 years ago the question was asked this is worthwhile? should they be put on trial? so many years have passed since the crime has been committed. i answer that, first, the passage of time
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 11:00am EST
,500 kilos of cocaine stored at one time. as far as crossing the stuff into the united states there were arrangements. people, that is u.s. customs agents and immigration officers were paid off at the international bridges. when the federal place called me i told them i was just the made of the house that the notice i was wearing a brand new pair of converse tissues and retorted oh yeah then why are you wearing new converse? we are going to torture you with electric shock and everything else. so they took me to jail. i was 17 at that time. and that is a sort of story how people get involved in the drug-trafficking business at an early age to make money and they are exposed to these amazing circumstances. huge amounts of drugs, heavily armed people and a very dangerous lifestyle. so this is my friend the female drug lord. >> as a journalist and anthropologist i appreciate the power of the story, and this book is full of stories, which makes extremely rich in in detail. i wonder if you can tell sort of some of the most surprising findings that you gleamed from speaking to both traffickers
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2010 11:00am EST
stored there at one time. as far as crossing the stuff in the united states they were arrangements. people that is u.s. custom agents and immigration officers were paid off at the international bridges. in the federales colony i told them i was just the meat of the house but they noticed i was wearing a rainy pair of converse vanishes and retorted, why are you wearing new converse? we're going to torture you with electric shocks on everything else. so they took me to jail. i was 17 at the time. and that sort of a story about how people get involved in the drug trafficking business at an early age to make money and they're exposed to these amazing circumstances, huge amounts of drugs, heavily armed people in a very dangerous lifestyle. so this is my friend. >> as a journalist and an anthropologist, i really appreciate the power of a story in this book is full of stories. which makes it extremely rich in detail. i wonder if you can tell us sort out some of the most icing findings that you gleaned from speaking both to drug traffickers and drug agents or something you didn't expect or
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 8:00pm EST
other nation in the united states. there are more is really nasdaq companies than japanese, than canadian and british and german than anything. it's extraordinary. capitalism hasn't been shown to fail. capitalism has been shown to work and here in the united states there is a tremendous amount of self pity this of course encouraged by the victimhood. one of the things on my radio show is the michael medved show where we are proud to say every day i am not a victim the idea of american victimhood suggests our standard of living and difficulties in our choices it's much lower. we can't live the kind of lives our parents live and it's getting worse and everyone has heard this. it is nonsense. robert wright. heritage in this building has some terrific work on this and i quote him extensively in the book. if you actually look at any meaningful measure of living standards in the united states the progress under the capitalist america particularly since 1980 has been dazzling, unprecedented. the options available to people, the extended life expectancy and for college we are now at a st
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 2:15pm EST
of the united states and everybody should come here to see it. and i'm delighted to be back here again. now this book, which is a big fat book can be used as a doorstop if you decide not to read it. it will work that way. the title of the book comes in the statement of jefferson. he referred to the united states, jefferson being the most expansive mind and president in history. he referred to the united states and he was president as an empire of liberty, a different kind of empire is what he saw. indeed, as i said, had great visions for the growth of this united states. i've introduced this book with a little brief description of rip van winkle's -- washington irving story, rip van winkle, which i think captures some of the extraordinary changes that took place in this. in 1789 and 1815. in fact, from the revolution to the second decade of the 19th century. irving, who was conservative and conservative sensibilities, wrote the short story which i think is his most famous short story, most of you are familiar with it. in the second decade of the 19th century. i think he was trying to expres
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2010 11:15pm EST
that he couldn't find a single publisher in the united states to pick out his book. there was not anyone who would touch it. i think people get the impression that as long as books like if i did it by o.j. simpson can get published, anything can get published and it is not the case so tonight we are here to celebrate something very very fortunate that books like this can be published. the power of governments cannot suppress can be published by amazing press is like city lights and me can hear the voice directly of some of the greatest statesmen living in the united states today, some of the greatest intellectuals and i am proud to introduce one of them now. please welcome howard zinn. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you alex. and thank you however you are who applauded. [laughter] if you did not applaud, thanks anyway. alex is from back pages books, right here on monday street, and they are responsible for this and i want to thank them. i hope it doesn't mind my saying this, but they are a struggling little bookstore and they need support like all struggling little bookstores,
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2010 7:00am EST
, and here in the united states there is a tremendous amount of self-pity that is encouraged by the victim. one of the things in my ratio is it's the michael medved show where we're proud to say everyday i am not a victim, the idea of american victimhood suggest that our standard of living and our difficulties and our choices, it's all much lower, we can't live the kind of lives that our parents live and it's getting worse. everyone has heard this. it is nonsense. now, robert rector rodger at heritage writer in the building has done terrific work on this and i quote him extensively in the book. if you actually look at any meaningful measure of living standards in the united states, the progress under capless american, particularly since 1980, has been dazzling, has been unprecedented. the options that are available to people, the extended life expectancy, college, we're now at at a stage where the majority of american young people in every ethnic group, are pursuing some form of post high school graduation after they graduate from high school. this is phenomenal. sometimes that education m
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2010 8:00am EST
of the united states. this same strategy of dividing the opposition has actually worked before to win counterinsurgency campaigns. there have been very few counterinsurgency campaigns that have been successful in the 20th century, but the defeat of the philippine rebels after the spanish-american war at the turn of the last century, the u.s. backed greek governments defeat of the guerrillas in 1947, and the british defeated the chinese insurgency in the 1950s, all of those have the same thing in common, that they split the opposition. however, in iraq the ethnosectarian fishers are still great. and i don't think the show is over yet. in my book, "partitioning for peace," which is on, what to do about iraq, i go through so the other ethnocentric conflict in world history and find a violent sometimes as the usually always returns unless the underlying issues have been resolved, which they have in iraq. they don't have an oil law which is their bread and butter commodity so you can see the level of disagreement in society. and of course, they have struggled even to get a date for the ele
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 4:00pm EST
endangered species, which means you cannot shoot them in the united states. people can shoot them in canada and in russia and england, but you can shoot them in america. you can't bring the carcass of the polar bear you shot them roust into the united states. i met someone in the united states was on this this very trip that i'm about to tell you about. we were on the ship in the background called cappy time and those of you who side with an russian icebreaker strand in the antarctic a couple of weeks ago was the sister ship of this one. and it looks very much like this. it looks like somebody said that a block of flats on a barge. and we the cabin upon the upper deck and had a huge bridge from which we could see everything. the point of this trip, was one of the leaders of the trip. we were going to the north pole. when you travel and as part of the world nbc bears off in the distance, as i said it's usually over there you see that white and moving. that's the bear. while this is somewhat closer. we had a bear that came this close to the ship and it was right alongside the ship. this will
CSPAN
Jan 3, 2010 8:00am EST
for the first time in the united states a cap and trade system. that process is moving forward in ways that if you had talked about it just two to three months ago, would have seemed impossible. so i'm actually -- this is obama -- so i'm actually more optimistic than i was about america being able to take leadership on the issue, joining europe which over the last several years has been ahead of us on this issue. and he was awarded a nobel peace prize. after years of politicians refusing to take action on cutting greenhouse gas emissions, there is a positive shift in washington. there is legislation moving through the senate now that you just heard about and that we hope will get passed in time for the big be international meeting in copenhagen in december. in hopenhagen. [laughter] i love that. i am optimistic and more so now than ever before. this is the most important moral problem of our time, and i believe that with with your help and all of us working together that we are on our way to solving it. the political will is developing, and state by state the across the united states l
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2010 11:30am EST
, the united states's perspective on relations with the muslim world and where do we go from here with the muslim world? for much of the past decade since the events of 9/11 we talked a lot about the muslim world. in our media it has become part of the language of our politics. it matters a lot to us. thinking often is the united states or the muslim world are not on the right path -- not on the same page. we fought a lot about how to fix that relationship and particularly think about writing those things that are not going right. that context, that worries us more than the question of extremism. the perception that the muslim world thinks too much about conservative ideas and too permissive towards extremism and this is something that will be addressed for policy consent. much of that is quite true. extremism is an issue of paramount concern. it is a foreign policy consideration. it is the major focus of u.s. foreign policy and to that extent it is also the way in which many americans view the muslim world. but there's also a tendency that it becomes too all consuming. it becomes
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2010 10:45am EST
because i feel that's the people of the united states at that moment when george bush got up before the microphone and said we must go to war than 11 took place, a terrorist act took place, and therefore we must go to work against afghanistan, while one if people are listening move history they would not immediately rushed as most americans did at that point. 80 percent of americans rushed to say yes. progress, of course, rush to say yes because that's the job of congress to say yes. whenever the president wants to go to war. and if people do some history there would not be that rush to support a work, there would not be bad acceptance of the idea we are going to war to fight terrorism. there would not be an acceptance of the idea we're going to war to bring democracy. >> , bring democracy to the whole middle east. because the people if they use of history they would know of the instances in the american past when presidents have come before the public and said, as president pulled did in 1846, with back to go into mexico to spread civilization for the mexicans were as mckinley did
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2010 6:30pm EST
. that the truth be preserved. and that we not forget what was done by the united states at guantanamo holding people in arbitrary detention and subjecting them to abuse for so long and all the lies and distortions that surround the prison. u to tell the truth and tell the stories both now and to preserve those stories for the future. in addition to the book, we have also set up an archive, the guantanamo bay detention archive in connection with nyu's library and seaton hall law school which the book in a sense is the beginning. and through the archive we're going to continue this important process of preserving, preserving the records of guantanamo, preserving the stories so that it will always be there and people will not be able to minimize, distort or alter the truth of what happened doct during these last eight years in guantanamo. finally, i want to say that in this day and age and specially in the area of counterterrorism lawyers have been vilified. you have individuals like john, for example, who used the law as a tool for justifying torture and illegality. and you really have a story
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2010 12:30am EST
that united states wanted out of vietnam and would not mind if they've lost on the battlefield and would not mind if a vietnam went communist. this is a point* where we have 550,000 troops in the country and be a no. i can assure you none of those 530,000 that the commander in chief said it is okay if we lose the war the reason why it nixon thought it would be 0k which she thought he had already lost was two achieve more detente with the soviet union and felt that was the overriding goal the superpowers must find a way to exist as peacefully court with other configuration but this was on par with the belief in that expressed in articles and foreign affairs in 1967 with speeches to the republican conventions and the movers and shakers clubs and just prior to that, it is not possible to isolate 1 billion chinese and have a say in a world in the future. it is very difficult for us to say he was wrong about that. i think he was quite effectively correct but the problem was he also felt that the same time you could not have an open at three and discussion of these issues and expect to come ou
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2010 10:00am EST
, guatemala and into the united states. these were hazardous journeys. in the introduction you heard some instance there was some 17000-mile journey. one of the ships i'm going to talk about, the golden venture, had been at sea for 120 days by the time the passengers got here. they had been in a hold of the ship for 120 days. that didn't mean anything to me. i didn't give it much thought. 300 people, in a space probably if we started at the shelf there and connected to the wall over there, would be smaller than this base. for 120 days, and i was trying to find historical analogues for other big wedges. i thought what about the mayflower? that came to plymouth with all the pilgrims. in 1620, how long were they a seat? they were at sea for 60 days. and the people on the golden venture for 120. the problem is some of the ships were not seaworthy, and sometimes they would overturn. people would go into debt to pay really enormous fees in order to come here to the united states. in the 1980s, you had to pay a snakehead was $18000. by the 1990s when they start moving people on the boats, the pr
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2010 10:00pm EST
has more companies listed on the nasdaq than any other nation in the united states. there are more is really nasdaq companies and japanese come a canadian, british or german or anything. capitalism has not been shown to fail but to work. here in the united states there is a tremendous amount of self pity that is a encouraged by the victim would mentality. one of the things of my radio show michael medved every day we are proud to say i am not a victim. the idea of victimhood suggest this standard of living and the difficulties in choices are lower we cannot live the kind of lives are parents lived and everybody has heard this. it is nonsense. right here in the building we have done terrific work on this and i quote him extensively. if you look at any meaningful measure of living standards, the progress under capitalistic america has been dazzling and unprecedented. options available to people the extended life expectancy or opportunities for college rear at this stage where the majority of american young people in every ethnic group are pursuing some form of post high school gradua
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 10:00am EST
at the united states department of justice when 9/11 happened. and among the things people are talking about, prosecuting the war on terror or how to keep the homeland safe, one of my colleagues from the criminal division was having conversation to me, and he said you're never going to believe what they're talking about upstairs in a brainstorming session. i said okay, i brace myself and said let me know. he said somebody throughout the idea of the naturalizing naturalized arab-american citizens. i said, that is crazy. once upon a time, when i was a teenager that was a fantasy to send my parents back to syria and i would've been the first to turn the men. but that didn't really seem particular kosher. of course it wasn't without historical precedent that in world war ii we had turned our japanese-american population. and it didn't happen because it's illegal and the united states has a role of interment. but it kept sword coming back to this idea, and why are they talking about arab-americans in this way. dearborn is an exception but in the national american imagination and consciousness, ar
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2010 6:30am EST
but true, you need to stop and kill the enemy. a few one-man -- the president of the united states or a few political leaders, the president of the united states, the leaders of the major european countries, and the european union can institute a bounty program and with nato or without nato can promise to bomb and degrade the military forces of any country undertaking eliminationist assault. they have the power to do this. literally overnight. it just takes a few moral men and women to change the eliminationist, the genocidal calculus of all future eliminationist and genocidal leaders. we need to tell the truth about our duty. ask yourselves each one of y you -- if i'm right, that a bounty program would have saved 800,000 people in rwanda, ask yourself would you say it should have been in place? how many of you would say, no, we should not have had a bounty program. it would have been better to let 800,000 people die including hundreds of thousands of children? how many of you would say that and tried to defend that position? i say it like this because i know that people will think that wha
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 8:00am EST
condemnation not for dictators but for the united states and. it was a clear attempt to try to discredit this organization. i have followed washington politics long enough to know that when top officials attack you instead of ignoring you it is because they are scared of you. the white house's attack on the group's credibility for me at that time was a clear affirmation of amnesty international integrity and power. we are talking about look bush administration but it is important to note that president obama signed the national defense authorization act that endorses another attempt by the u.s. government to conduct military commission trial. amnesty international and irene khan are once again pushing and changing the way we see human rights. in a new campaign called demand dignity amnesty international is seeking to leave poverty caused to human-rights. irene khan argues that party remains a global epidemic because it continues to be defined as an economic problem that should be addressed in foreign aid and investment. in her new book "the unheard truth: poverty and human rights," she s
CSPAN
Jan 9, 2010 7:45pm EST
in the united states and elsewhere and the vietnam war that was fought on the ground if the whole of the vietnam and communist, the rest would quickly follow. the so-called domino effect. as it happened the dominoes fell not in asia in the 1970's but eastern europe in 1989. we shouldn't forget either that thanks largely to the huge population of china, more than one-fifth of humanity still live under what may be regarded as communist rule. up until 1989 there were 16 communist states as i would define them. oddly there are 36 countries today which were at one time communist. that contradiction is to be explained by the fact the soviet union, one state broke up and became 15 states and czechoslovakia and yugoslavia also broke up so there'll be were 16 communist states but there were 36 countries that were communist and today there are five common is countries, china, vietnam, laos, north korea and cuba. the first three have been developing market economies on a substantial private sectors. the hybrid regimes, political economist economically not. china has been described as a state of party cabal
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 11:30am EST
to the united states and became senator from alabama and he has authored a remarkable book, it is called "when hell was in session". which is about his experiences, all those many years when this vietnamese tried to break camp here, they tried to break every betty. and it was he, admiral denton, who when forced to appear in a propaganda film, he did two things. using his eyelids he blinked out the word torture and got the word out that they were being tortured, and he said that he didn't know what was going on because he was in prison and but what everett is the government said he believed it and he supported it and that turned him even more vicious abuse. so admiral denton, congratulations. on a life of service to your country. as far as i'm concerned was way above and beyond the call of duty. we really appreciated. i would like to talk to you about some of the things you have in the book here. >> let me first say, you've served our country in many many ways, business, fbi, cia, government, and that is fair to you in the magnitude and the versatility of your service. >> service, i've tried to
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 9:45am EST
is that without nuclear weapons the united states and soviet union, and they got into a war, wouldn't have to worry about nuclear war. they would only have to worry about a war as big as world war ii. it seems to be if they did to it a deterrent that was plenty good. the world has been run since world war ii by either the same people or the intellectual heirs of the people who try to prevent world war ii from happening. because they thought it even worse than world war i, and they were right about that. it gave him no pleasure to find out that the idea that these people were there for casual stumble into a war that would be as bad or possibly worse than world war ii is just absurd it things under and seems to me that in addition, i do think that there has been -- there was one of two powers. one was substantially anti-status quo which is the communist side. however, they never, ever had the idea of advancing communist revolution through hitler a christian. they were anti-status quo in the sense they want to subvert conscious. they want to encourage class warfare, revolutionary civil war an
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 9:00am EST
in the united states and afghanistan to improve the leaders of indigenous allies. the indigenous allies had severe leadership problems. this has often been ignored by senior officials in the united states. in vietnam after we entered the ground war in 1965 general westmoreland ignored the forces for several years and let them try to sort it out which is sort of nice in deference toward sovereignty. the reality was it allowed problems to fester. in iraq in the early years, they did not pay attention to the iraqis were choosing as police commanders with unfortunate results. smarter great power allies came up with the variety of genius ways to deal with this problem. some of them in afghanistan, i would emphasize the personal senior decisionmakers should have the greatest knowledge to look at the different officers in the past to look at what might work here. the highest risk and highest reward was the covert action to replace the chief of state. this worked sometimes. in vietnam it was a catastrophic failure. in 1963 we orchestrated the overview of south vietnam's president. he was better tha
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 11:00pm EST
and liberalizes either in soviet, domestic or foreign policy. casey was wrong. at that time, the united states was also claiming repeatedly that soviet union was developing its own missile defense program, its own strategic defense initiative. paul nitzan gave a speech in july saying of the soviets, clearly they see the potential applications ford vance defensive technologies, otherwise there would not be investing so much effort in so many resources in this area. and of course we had some good propaganda of our own in a number of glossy reports which were issued by the pentagon and state department. we show the soviets have a laser reaching up to satellite. this pencil drawing appeared at least four times and pentagon and state department brochures, but this laser shooting at these guys did not exist. in fact the soviets at one time wanted to build such a laser but after years of trying they had failed. this is the state of our knowledge of corporate job. what really was going on? what really was happening was quite different. within three months of taking office, all the top designers and co
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2010 1:00am EST
but for the united states. it was a clear attempt to try -- officials attack you instead ignore you it is because they are scared of you. the white house attack on the group's credibility for me at that time was a clear affirmation of amnesty international's integrity and power. now, we are talking about the bush administration but it's important to note that this past wednesday president barack obama signed the national defense authorization act that in forces yet another attempt to conduct a commission trials. amnesty international and irene are once again pushing and changing the way that we see human rights. in a new campaign called demand dignity amnesty international is seeking to make poverty to human rights. irene argues that the poverty remains a global epidemic because it continues to be defined as an economic problem or and the aid and investment. why it's called the unheard truth poverty and human rights she says in powering the poor with basic rights for security and food and even health care as our only chance of a eradicating poverty. before joining the amnesty international, she s
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2010 8:00am EST
of the united states" has sold over a million copies since it was published in 1980. howard zinn died of a heart attack in santa monica, california, wednesday, january 27. he was 87 years old. howard zinn was also guest on book tv's in depth program in september of 2002. you can wash it online at book tv.org. >> psychiatry professor jonathan metzi argues that the increased finding of the rates of schizophrenia in black men was fab crate indicated during the 1960's and 1970's to undermine the civil rights movement. the university of ann arbor hosts the talk. >> it's so nice and so wonderful for me to be able to start this whole process and start this release. the book just came out two days ago in this community, i owe so much gratitude and thanks to so many of the people in this room, ann herman and the women's studies department, carol and erwig, i'm also honored that two of the really excellent research associates and assistant that worked with me on the project, sarah and sasha are here, so it's really, really wonderful for me to start the project and start the public recognition for all of u
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 8:00am EST
of the work of herman kahn starting in 1967 for the united states in the early '80s for the soviets, it was actually a short reduction in arms, way below debating on how you count anywhere from 70 to 90 plus% below where we were in 1967. warheads got smaller as accuracies improved, etc. ironically, we are now seeing with iran and pakistan and north korea, the prospect of a world because of proliferation where you're going to have a whole bunch of countries who have these weapons, who already have them, but the proliferating them, at least north korea's case, where the iranians if they get it, there wasn't anybody over there doing that kind of thinking. and did you get in the mideast as a result of the iranian nuclear weapon, you could easily get saudi calling up islamabad saying would you guys like to sell if you? none of these countries i waited, both united states and russians the better part of 20 years to do, which was think through these things, learn from some experiences and with the cautions instinct of kennedy and khrushchev and khrushchev had to restrain castro who is read
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2010 6:00pm EST
achievements the association of the united states army presented to him two years ago the george marshall metal its highest award. so here to describe that life story and is my friend lieutenant general julius becton. [applause] >> thank you very much. as you may remember we always -- we sometimes had difference of opinion. [laughter] >> [inaudible] >> you're the boss, that's right. and it worked out okay. it is always good seeing you and thank you for letting me come to your facility. frankly as i look around i didn't realize i would know so many people from past experiences. let me start by giving a brief comment about my background to set the stage so to speak. my father was a janitor, my mother was a domestic worker. they had third and tenth grade education respectively. my wife's parents were similarly, had similar backgrounds. but the two of us started working together with a lot of help from a lot of friends and reached a height in our world of academics, politics, military and society. this autobiography was initially designed for our grandchildren and great-grandchildren with a simple
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 10:30pm EST
. the afl or anti-saloon league has been gotten forgotten about. from 1893 to 1918. when the united states went to war in germany in 1917, the largest ethnic group in the country at that time were germans and guess who also were their burgers? the germans. so, you had a whole ethnic group whose rights are basically pushed aside. suddenly there was this huge anti-german hysteria in the country and drinking beer, which is what most americans drink at that point suddenly looked literally on the asiatic area to the afl at that point. people thought we needed this year for the war and hence and went on to the states about people really even thinking about it very much. congress voted on a very quickly when i'm the states and all but two of the states ratified 18th amendment. the states were rhode island and connecticut. both states had very heavy catholic population, therefore, realize that prohibition was targeted at them because the temperance movement have a very strong nativist provident sentiments behind it. >> our next stop year is the striking brick church, calvary baptist church. >> the
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 5:00pm EST
't apply here. the case index for the united states is available from 1990 annually and the case should other index between the year 2000 to 2006 rose by more than a had in the preceding 100 years. something was bound to end badly and so right now as we speak on a am sure that there are new baubles being created, not here, not get, but new bubbles are being created right now -- i don't know if you've heard this but this has to be one of my favorites. it's more money has been lost searching for yields than at the point of a gun. and the search for yield right now with u.s. interest rates close to cero, the search for the yields is going into emerging markets right now as we speak. and so, now it's conceivable that many of those countries will say no this happens at the united states. it doesn't happen here. it is human nature. in reviewing this massive amount of data one of the conclusions we come to is it is a very human delusion if you will that those rules don't apply to us. we don't see any exceptions to the rules. if you look across regions and across time you will find at one point
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 3:30pm EST
in that position the president of the united states also asked chief justice william is to serve on the military commission's review panel with the rank of major general. judge williams has acknowledged to be one of the leading authorities on a life and times of a young perry lawyer from a little like. he served as founding chairman of the lincoln for a president of the u.s. grant association for 12 years serving as president of the lincoln group of boston and for nine years as president of the abraham lincoln association. judge williams is the author or editor of 11 books on mr. lincoln, the latest of which is lincoln lessons people and reflections on america's greatest leader, co are paired with william peterson and published by the southern illinois university press this year. judge williams is working on an annotated bibliography of all of the lincoln titles published since 1865 st. louis he should have that completed this weekend. at the same time is writing a book on lincoln as he rode. he has served on active duty with the united states army in the republic of vietnam. his decorations inc
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2010 5:15pm EST
on was the purpose of in the united states after 1964 and 1965 because there were these three legislative changes that happened on the national level but fundamentally changed america and essentially the foundations for the kind of society that could elect somebody like barack obama, president in 2008 and those are the voting rights act of 65, the civil rights act of '64 and immigration act of 65 and most people don't know the legislation's and they all happened under lyndon johnson and fundamentally transform who is american, who can vote, who can participate in the american's creation of a society and political system and so when i decided to do is put together an alternate tie line of defense from 65 to the present that are important from an arab american perspective so of course these are important to all americans like 9/11 and other things since the american memory is much shorter than for example the air of memory. those defense the 73 energy crisis or the 91 gulf war passed from american memory as a significant moments and then other defense like what happens in california 1985 are comple
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 9:00pm EST
. they make good bin laden's threat to destroy the united states. if a bomb goes off in peoria obvious columbus, ohio, that'd be a bad thing. but the idea of the rest of the country would fall apart, everybody starves to death or something strikes me as ridiculous kind of exaggeration. these people are never questioned about that. as this kind of hyperventilating has been taking place now for decades. i'm trying to -- i tried to put that into context. i do want to stress that nuclear weapons are terrible. they can kill lots of people. it's just that one bomb like that isn't the end of the planet. and we'd had years and years of that. okay. let me talk a little bit about the exstraplation that's gone beyond that. not only to nuclear weapons, but now they are in a new category as wepons of mass destruction. these are -- the phrase has been around for quite a long period of time. but it only got really inflated and became very common in the 1990s, basically in the first bush administration and in the clinton administration. so what has happened is the nuclear weapons which definitely are
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 10:30am EST
in the united states? >> prohibition will start actually in jangly 16, 1920, once the 18th amendment was ratified. but it was actually part of a century long movement to ban on-call in this country. that movement was called the temperance movement. the idea behind their temperance meant to moderate one striking, but by the 1820s, the movement decided that people have to abstain for political on-call. this was led by evangelical protestant churches starting in the 18 teams and they believe that alcohol was simple, it was wrong. they called it demon rum. associate alcohol with a double. and therefore, everybody had to stop ringing altogether. this movement lasted a century long. their idea was to clean up and sober up american society and eventually end up with a decent middle class, largely white-based protestant american society. and ultimately they got their way in prohibition itself. which was a constitutional amendment, 18th amendment, to ban alcohol in america, and that went into effect in 1920. prohibition lasted only less than 14 years because of extreme civil disobedience. the
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 9:45pm EST
is not that far from the united states. it's just on the other side of the caribbean sea. to get from there to columbia you cross the caribbean sea and the gulf and go up the east coast of the united states. but as it happens this was january and all kind of planes were delayed that might among them ovianca 052. here they were on a routine flight from columbia to new york. the captain of the plane was
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2010 9:45am EST
of 205 traders who are at this moment operating out of the state department of the united states fashioning our policies and so forth. there was no list. he had no names. was all a lot. that became mccarthyism right there. the republican leaders are pushing him forward. f-series of ten buckets with tom are easing down. it was named mccarthyism. is part of the language. that was what shawn martin was brilliant for. capturing a moment in time and making it a part of our history. it was an irreplaceable gift. he did this decade after decade after decade. i found myself fascinated. there are 218 dvds of herblock cartoons and 200 that you will see that go from the beginning, the early -- i tried to write a narrative about who he was and a capsule of the times. the war, vietnam, etc. civil-rights, the mccarthy period, fear. herblock died a couple weeks before 9/11. you have an extraordinary range of history captured in these cartoons. i hope you will find it of interest. it is the kind of thing that will serve as a reminder. i want to talk about herblock rhythm-and-blues great cartooni
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2010 10:30pm EST
think that as people are -- let's say in the united states alone. having a crisis having to do with people's head being filled with elusion. so i do think there must be thinkers and writers, and, you know, plays, books, because that might help. but it becomes ludicrous to, you know, try to judge whether your own works are valuable. i mean that -- that is something to be kept very secret for yourself. >> hi. >> with the last chunk of the essay was the art is somewhere prothetic, and you seem to tend towards wanting to make the world a better place. as we can tell, it's -- well, you have a run out in london and a whole season in london and we don't get a chance as much though to see things here of yours. that seems to be the case of the whole slew of really great plays that would probably make a similar point or at least with in the same vein. i was wondering what your thoughts are about getting over that sort of hurdle? whether starting in new york or regionally. >> boy, that -- i obviously have taken the coward's way out to a certain extent. if they are more interested in plays
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 12:30am EST
endeavor with people from all over the world, african-american women from one part of the united states to the other part and the caribbean as well as places like libya, cameroon, niger and other places in africa. so we are extremely excited about the historical occasion of the first african-american woman in the white house and the response of african-americans worldwide to the vacation. >> since peggy did mention the contributors, could we have them just stand right now? those who are here? we have laurie and didier and donna and we are going to invite them a little later in the program to say something about what this experience has meant to them and what motivated them to write to us because what we have found over the course of the last two months since the book was published that we've developed a network, sisterhood we call the dtm sisterhood network and its comprised of these 100 women who contributed to this outstanding work and historic work as peggy mentioned, and so we want you to know them a little bit better as well and so we will have them say something has you go through
CSPAN
Jan 3, 2010 10:00am EST
thought illegal -- illegal -- for a woman to be president of the united states? what is post-feminist about a society where our ads and television commercials are demeaning to women such as one for a very popular chain store that chose an adolescent girl lying on a target with a bull's eye right between her legs? what is post-feminist about a society with a subprime mortgage debacle fell with particular hardship on poor women and women of color? these were women who were struggling to have a piece of the american dream. some were single moms, some were elderly moms. and when they started out, their mortgage rates were rates that they could afford only to see them adjusted and adjusted and adjusted upward until they had to forfeit their homes. iowa knee that hill -- iowa ania hill who's a law professor at brandeis university, has just completed a study in which she found all women no matter what their background were charged more than men, even men in the same differently -- comparable, i should say, financial situations. what is post-feminist about a society where movies, g-r
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 7:00pm EST
. [laughter] and i understand larry was so sad to leave france to go back to the united states that i was able the next day to give him a nice piece of news. i said to him, larry, as i am taking it to the station where you are going to take your vote in germany back to the states that want to tell you that you now have a family in france, my wife has announced to me this morning that she was expecting a child. do you want to be the godfather? and strangely enough, this child named alexander 35 years later lectured in this very museum because she had written a wonderful book about a great painter. so larry knew that he was going to come back to france and he did. six months later as a reporter for "newsweek" and as dan told you i entered paris and here we were going to compete for the big events of the news, but as competitors. larry collins one day locked me in my bedroom in baghdad, so i wouldn't send the photographs of the iraqi revolution, and long time ago, to paris match but i was able to avenge myself a few months later by giving him a wrong train schedule to a chain leaving to-- and i w
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2010 12:30am EST
was checked >> a new agreement signed in new york between them u.s.s.r. and the united states reaffirmed the removal of all restrictions on communications much as partitions and trade between west berlin and western zones of germany. >> attention, attention we have a communique about the lifting of the berlin blockade. there was officially announced by the big four powers at 3:00 this afternoon that the blockade will be lifted on may 12th >> men's lives the gates are being opened now and the first vehicles are going. they seem rather happy about the whole thing. no matter where i may go i shall watch always with interest the part of berlin will play in the formation of a german government and with complete confidence that this part will be a democratic party. therefore i shall not use the english word goodbye but rather try to say to you men's lives. >> her earlier general lucius clay, when he left berlin at the end of the airlift 750,000 people lined the route to tempelhof airport silently as he left the city. >> this was remarkable seeing the scenes of berlin. one of the scenes there w
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 11:00pm EST
for the united states is available from 1890 annually. and a case-shiller index between the year 2000 and 2006 rose by more than it had in the preceding 100 years. something was bound to happen. and so, right now as we speak i am sure that there are new levels being created, not here, not yet come abutt snook bubbles are being created right now-- i don't know if you have heard this story but it has to be one of my favorites. it is, more money has been lost searching for euros than that the point of a gun. and, the search for yields right now with u.s. interest rates being close to zero, the search for yields is going into a marching markets right now as we speak, and so now it is conceivable that many of those countries will say no, this happens in the united states. it doesn't happen here. it is human nature. in mcewing this massive amount of data, one of the conclusions that we have come to is it is a very human to elusion if you will, that those rules don't apply to us. we don't see any exceptions to the rule. if you look at across regions. if you look across time you will find that one poi
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2010 3:00pm EST
as a colonel in the united states are forced. >> talking about the danger these men went through flying into and out of berlin with a feathery corridors into berlin, one in the north and one in the south and then the central one a range as the return. but one of the things -- i wonder if you could describe the conditions of landing at the temple of the airport in the center of berlin. >> temple of the airport for any of you who have seen it one of the most extraordinary places in the world in the first place on one side is a building. it's done in nazi gothic, it was the largest building in the world three-quarters of a mile long looped around with seven levels, there were hospitals complain factories down into the ground. they had more floor space than any building in the world until the pentagon was finished. on the other side of this goal, very pretty, the other side of this grass bowl six and seven story apartment buildings and they couldn't be torn down, not in a city that had lost 80% of its housing, so the planes had to come into this grass airstrip with metal bats, we put down m
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 10:00am EST
.m. was clearly the lone voice demanding active anti fascist activity, demanding the united states go to war at a time when that was not a popular position in the country at large and not a popular position in the american left either. for reasons already cited. for the group of people surrounding ingersoll, the creator of the paper, this was a unique opportunity to express themselves artistically and to express themselves politically in this crusading anti fascist journal. later i can tell you about some of the crusades the paper went on leading up to the war and after the united states got involved. that general total commitment to anti fascism as being the most important political stance of the time was what made p.m. and unique place to be. >> paul's marvelous book here is based on his ph.d. but in spite of that, one would expect it to be not as entertaining or well written as is. he has gone against the usual rules of academia. it is a marvelous read and did does explain this -- ingersoll had started out with life magazine and fortune, a paper aimed at big business and before that he ha
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